If You’re Catholic…

If you’re Catholic and you don’t go to Mass every Sunday and Holy Day of Obligation, you should not take Communion.

If you’re Catholic and do not believe that the Eucharist is the real and actual Flesh and Blood of Jesus Christ, God Incarnate, you should not take Communion.

If you’re Catholic and you are in a state of mortal sin (sex outside of marriage; homosexual acts; intentional lust; masturbation; murder; abortion; sacrilege; reception of Confirmation, Matrimony, or Holy Orders while in a state of mortal sin; witchcraft; etc.), you should not take Communion.

If you’re Catholic and have not observed the Eucharistic Fast, which is one hour before Communicating, you should not take Communion.

If you’re Catholic and have been excommunicated from the Church, you should not take Communion.

If you’re Catholic and you haven’t done your Easter Duty, which is making a good Confession and taking Holy Communion at least once, during the Easter season, you should not take Communion.

If you’re Catholic and you have not observed required days of fasting (Ash Wednesday and Good Friday) and abstinence from meat (Fridays of Lent), you should not take Communion.

If you’re Catholic and you have openly and/or publicly dissented from Church teaching, you should not take Communion.

If you’re Catholic and any of these apply to you, it is very simple to bring oneself back into being in right standing. All it takes is a good Confession to a priest, and you can start taking Communion again! It’s that easy. And if you’re not Catholic, but want to be, and want to take part in the Sacraments, especially Holy Communion, seriously consider going through RCIA!

 

 

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3 thoughts on “If You’re Catholic…

  1. I get the point you are making, but might there be a better way to present this argument? As it is written, it seems like you are standing above us all condemning our sins and telling us what to do and what not to do. Of course, you have the church’s backing on all these points, and you do have a certain authority as a Catholic to call people out, but to what purpose?

    As a Protestant, I look at this list and think, “Well, I’m hopeless. There’s no way I can ever take communion.” Unless I make a “good” confession, but what qualifies as good? Good in whose eyes, God’s eyes? I know you’ll disagree with me on this next point, but I still believe that nothing we do is good enough for God, which is why Christ stepped in for us. I still think there’s value in confessing to a priest, I don’t disagree there, but I think you should emphasize that the forgiveness comes from the church THROUGH CHRIST.

    Anyway, I hope you’re still open to discussing these things.

    Dennis

    • I see what you mean about how to present the argument. I could go into depth about each one of these things, but that would take awhile. The point is that many Catholics do not realize that they shouldn’t be taking Communion mostly because they have no idea what the Church teaches, nor have any idea what the Eucharist actually is and that what St. Paul talks about in 1 Corinthians isn’t just a nice thought, but that when we present ourselves for the Eucharist and we are in any of these conditions, we are guilty of defaming the Body and Blood of Jesus Christ.

      I should probably talk more about the Sacrament of Reconciliation, where it is founded in Scripture, why only Catholic priests have the Authority among men to absolve sins, what constitutes a good Confession, and that the Church ultimately teaches that the forgiveness found in making a Confession comes from Jesus Christ through the hands of the priest, that it is Christ who forgives us in the Confessional.

      But to summarize my reasoning for this post is that sacrilegious Communion is one of the gravest sins against Jesus Christ and this is one of those cases where people need to be stopped first and then explained afterwards, just as one wouldn’t sit down and explain to a four-year-old about heat conduction, heat sensation neurons, and the physics of a pot of water falling from the ground before telling the child not to touch the hot pot, we must prevent people from committing grave sin and then explain why what they would have done is grave.

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